Pictures can speak louder than words.

children-drawing

I liked to draw pictures when I was a child. I wasn’t any good at it, but that didn’t stop me from doing so. My drawings were always full of life and colors; they told beautiful stories of dogs, cats, cows and roosters. I drew pictures of our farm with green fields, beautiful trees and gigantic flowers. No matter what I drew, there was always a smiling sun in the corner.

I still like children’s drawings and have some of our neighbor kids master pieces pinned to a wall.

Children’s drawings show the world through their eyes, what makes them so interesting. Pictures can talk loud and clear and so I thought I am going to share some pictures that I found online with all of you.

The eyes of refugee children from Syria have seen and witnessed things that no child should see.

 

drawings of refugee children 8

A refugee child from Syria used the waiting time in at the refugee camp in Germany to draw a picture, because the asylum process in long and boring. The child gave the finished drawing to one of the officials as a gift and the civil servant was visibly touched by it.

The drawing is divided into two halves. One half shows the brutal conditions in the child’s home country and the other half shows the child’s new life in Germany. The half with the Syrian flag shows a destroyed house, a dead body is lying on the ground and a child with a torn foot is running on crutches; severed limbs are lying on the ground.

The other picture half with the German flag shows a house with a long driveway and people with suitcases. The German flag and the word “Polizi/Police,” are framed with red hearts.

It is hard to imagine what all these children might have seen.

I wish I could change the world, or at least the parts that I don’t like, but I can’t. I can just write down what I feel.

Pictures can speak louder than words sometimes. I remember the picture of the small boy who drowned and who was found at the Turkish coast.

image of the syrian child

Imagine we would give crayons and paper to the adults, I wonder what they would draw?

I know that many of us are afraid, because Muslim extremist makes us fear the worst. I am scared as well, I am no exception. I believe it’s OK to be scared, but it’s not OK to damn all, because of a few. I don’t want our hearts to be hardened, I don’t want us to close our doors.

Look at the above picture again, do you think the boy Mohamed, who drew this picture, will be a Muslim extremist? I don’t believe so, I don’t believe so at all. I wouldn’t be surprised if he will be a policeman himself one day, who will protect his new country.

Fear is poison to the soul, that’s at least my humbled opinion.

Maybe we all should draw more and talk less?

 


I would walk away from an audio book, because my blog wouldn’t be the same without the pictures, regardless who would read it.

Voice Work

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17 thoughts on “Pictures can speak louder than words.

  1. Pingback: A Child’s Drawings from the 1950s – Health from one Heart to Another

  2. That’s an interesting thought. What WOULD adults draw and color? Especially now that adult coloring books have come in fashion, perhaps drawing pictures is the next logical step. A prompt book with a prompt at the top of a blank page: Draw your favorite animal from when you were a child. How therapeutic would that be?

  3. It is sad to know that innocent children are witness to such horror. It is real-and many are numb and disassociated by the images seen on the news and other sources. It is terrifying to realize the truth.

  4. Last year I went to Prague with my husband and in one of the synagogues an exhibition on the children’s drawings from Theresienstad’s Kz camp. Very touching to see children’s drawings. I still have mine form the 1950s

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