That’s how you grow corn the right way

cornfield

There was a farmer who grew excellent quality corn. Every year he won the award for the best grown corn. One year a newspaper reporter interviewed him and learned something interesting about how he grew it. The reporter discovered that the farmer shared his seed corn with his neighbors. “How can you afford to share your best seed corn with your neighbors when they are entering corn in competition with yours each year? ” the reporter asked.

“Why sir,” said the farmer, “Didn’t you know? The wind picks up pollen from the ripening corn and swirls it from field to field. If my neighbors grow inferior corn, cross-pollination will steadily degrade the quality of my corn. If I am to grow good corn, I must help my neighbors grow good corn.”

I don’t expect all of us to go around and share what we have with our neighbors, not even the people who preach it every Sunday do that. (I always wondered about that).

Is there a certain percentage that we should give or we should share?  How much are we suppose to share and how much are we suppose to give?  Are there no guidelines?

We have a roof over our head and there is food in our fridge. The house is warm and in the evening we sleep in a comfortable bed. Even our dogs have their own dog beds and could sleep there, if they ever remember that they aren’t suppose to be on our furniture.

Everything we have we worked for, nothing was given to us. We worked hard and we deserve what we have. Isn’t that right?

We do see the homeless and the less fortunate, but their less fortunate lifestyle isn’t our fault. Sharing and giving -well, I am sorry we don’t have enough to give and we most certainly will not share what we have.

“If I am to grow good corn, I must help my neighbors grow good corn.”

Maybe it’s not us the individual who should share and give, but the neighborhoods, the communities, the villages and cities. It’s all of us, one for all…all for one. It’s  not giving or sharing, it’s giving back.

The power of collectivity, that’s what it comes down to. The principle of success, the law of life.

None of us truly wins, until we all win!

No nation is truly rich, when there are people on the streets begging for food, work and shelter.

No nation is truly great, when people turn their back to the ones in need.

 

When Giving is all we have

by Alberto Ríos, 1952

 

One river gives
Its journey to the next.

We give because someone gave to us.
We give because nobody gave to us.

We give because giving has changed us.
We give because giving could have changed us.

We have been better for it,
We have been wounded by it—

Giving has many faces: It is loud and quiet,
Big, though small, diamond in wood-nails.

Its story is old, the plot worn and the pages too,
But we read this book, anyway, over and again:

Giving is, first and every time, hand to hand,
Mine to yours, yours to mine.

You gave me blue and I gave you yellow.
Together we are simple green. You gave me

What you did not have, and I gave you
What I had to give—together, we made

Something greater from the difference.

cornfield3

 

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17 thoughts on “That’s how you grow corn the right way

  1. “The power of collectivity, that’s what it comes down to. The principle of success, the law of life.
    None of us truly wins, until we all win!
    No nation is truly rich, when there are people on the streets begging for food, work and shelter.
    No nation is truly great, when people turn their back to the ones in need”

    I agree with Vellissima and your comment .. on the comment about Monsanto and wish you had a like button 🙂

    I have like you worked for everything, no hand outs no parents leaving us anything.. And I belong to several charity organisations and contribute regular to Save the Children, The Red Cross and other charities when I view them worthy.. Along with tossing coins and even buying sandwiches and soft drinks for homeless people and dog food for their dogs..
    The lists are endless and there are always TV adds wanting us to give more, along with all the flyers that drop on our doormats that must have cost a small fortune to print begging for money..

    Giving when we can, and helping those in need when they need it is important.. But more than all our material goods, We should also consider what we are giving to the world via our thoughts..

    The gift of compassionate thoughts is also much needed, Being Kinder to one another is a gift, to smile and be helpful costs us nothing.. So many Gifts we can contribute to society.. Instead many take sides, Judge, condemn, and react with anger without considering the energies they are adding into the vortex of the world

    We plough the seeds and scatter the good seeds on the ground.. Lets also hope we plant some good seeds via our thoughts.. Or like Vellissima said.. We only reap what we sow.

    Loved this post xxx

    Have a great weekend xxx 🙂 and thank you so much for your wonderful visit xx

    Liked by 2 people

  2. There was a time when people cared about their neighbour. Survival depended on neighbours and communities working together.
    Somewhere along the line that changed.
    The world changed and people became suspicious and fearful of each other.
    Hell! Most people don’t even get along with their family members, let alone neighbours.

    Personally … I blame all the *confrontation* media which creates anxiety and fear where nothing might have otherwise been there. Shame.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Giving doesn’t have to be monetary, and no one expects you to house the homeless. However, if you have a warm jacket that’s taking up room in your closet, a warm jacket can make all the different in the life of one person. And sometimes, that one person is the only life you need to change.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Beautiful example. Now consider Monsanto, which not only doesn’t give corn, but encourages corn that doesn’t give viable seed. This is what we are up against, and we had better start collectively working against it. What we sow we reap.

    Liked by 2 people

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